Morning tea - my homemade yoghurt and berry muffin.
Morning tea – my homemade yoghurt and berry muffin.

I first started making yoghurt in June 2015 when I was thinking about how I was going to get through the Plastic Free July Challenge I’d set for myself – and therefore my family because I do all the shopping. My daughter was obsessed with yoghurt pouches, ‘drinking’ at least two a day and my husband often enjoyed a large tub of yoghurt. My son and I weren’t really fans of yoghurt.

One of my main aims during the challenge was to find plastic free alternatives to everything we already ate and used around the home. I knew that if I started forcing other family members give up things they enjoyed I wouldn’t stand any chance of success or lasting change. So yoghurt was one of the things I had to figure out.

The best bits about homemade yoghurt are that it is so easy, and it tastes so good! Even I enjoy yoghurt now  (my son still won’t let yoghurt near his lips to figure out if he likes it or not). I think it is because I get to use fresh, raw, full-cream milk. Other benefits are that I always have yoghurt on hand for recipes like muffins and smoothies, and I didn’t have to buy anything extra like a yoghurt maker or kitchen thermometers.

The Real Food Companion by Matthew Evans is a kitchen resource for people who care about where their food comes from.
The Real Food Companion by Matthew Evans is a kitchen resource for people who care about where their food comes from.

To learn how to make yoghurt I pulled my copy of The Real Food Companion by Matthew Evans off the shelf and read the Dairy chapter with interest. I also found a video of Matthew making yoghurt which uses a slightly different method to that in the book; finally I tweaked the process to suit myself.  This is how I do it, you will need:

  • 1 litre full cream milk. If you are not able to collect your own milk in reusable containers, Miranda Dale Dairy is an East Gippsland brand of organic and unhomogenised milk that comes in glass bottles. You can buy it from some farmers markets in Gippsland and a few stores (it is hard to come by). If you had access to bulk milk powder you could experiment with this, but if plastic packaging is your only option, buy as large an amount as you can so that there is a less packaging to product ratio – make sure you don’t waste it.
  • 80g natural plain yoghurt as a starter – choose one with a flavour that you like and check the label to ensure it only contains milk solids and live yoghurt cultures – no flavours, emulsifiers or thickeners. Remember to save a bit from each batch to make your next lot. After a while you may need to refresh your culture with another bought yoghurt.

 

Add 1 litre of milk to a pan and heat until just before boiling.
Add 1 litre of milk to a pan and heat until just before boiling.

Add one litre of full cream milk to a pan and heat until just before boiling. You are at this point when the milk starts to look frothy.

Frothy milk just before boiling point.
Frothy milk just before boiling point.

Turn off heat and let cool until you can leave your hand on the outside of the pan – it should still be warm.  Stir in the yoghurt.

Stir in your starter yoghurt.
Stir in your starter yoghurt.

Pour into sterilised jars. I  use jars of sizes suitable for school lunches, baking amounts and snacks. To sterilise jars leave in the oven at 120 degrees Celsius for 20 minutes.

I use jars of sizes that suit how we use and eat the yoghurt.
I use jars of sizes that suit how we use and eat the yoghurt.

Bundle the pots together, wrap in two towels and leave in a warm room overnight (about 12 hours). In the morning place in the fridge to cool and eat within two weeks.

Finished yoghurt ready to be enjoyed.
Finished yoghurt ready to be enjoyed.

As you can see from the picture I have some pink yoghurts. I added a drop of food dye to interest my daughter. Because the yoghurts she had been ‘drinking’ contained a lot of sugar, she did not initially like the change. I am slowly weaning her off the sugar in yoghurt by adding just enough to sweeten it up a bit. I add a little bit less each time, in the hope that she will eat it completely naturally in a little while. I’m also going to start experimenting a bit more with flavours I can add. She will eat it without the sugar if I mix in berries before serving.

If you prefer a more detailed description of making yoghurt at home, please follow the link above to Matthew Evan’s video.

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10 thoughts

  1. This must be the year for 1st time yoghurt makers, I too sought the wisdom of Matthew Evans and was thrilled with the results.
    Try using your yoghurt as an icecream base and add 1/4 cup of you favourite homemade jam to 1+ litre of yoghurt…Yum

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  2. Hi Tammy
    Ive just have ot a quick question about the original yoghurt as i make my own yogurt too. Where do you buy your original yoghurt from, all the natural yoghurt I seem to find are in plastic containers?
    Also have you got Matthew Evans book about home preserving meats, fish, dairy etc-you would love it only i can’t remember the name of it-sorry.

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    1. No I don’t have that book but I’ll keep an eye out for it. Yes I can only find the starter yoghurt in plastic too. Apparently you can order cultures but I imagine the packaging would end up being just as bad. There must be away to start totally from scratch but I haven’t found it yet.

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      1. Have you got kefir grains? They make a yoghurt style culture with the consistency of cream but apparently they have much much more beneficial bacteria than yoghurt. The grains look like cauliflower but you just keep using them time and time again but you must care for them kinda like kombucha. I haven’t got any but one day when i have my own farm 😊 i think it would be a great asset.

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